Three Ways to Make NaNoWriMo Work for You

NaNoWriMo. One of the most talked-about months of the year for authors and casual writers alike, but few actually take on the challenge. Fewer still finish it.

I’m one of those people. I have never used November to write 50,000 words in one go. Instead, I’ve used it to build my writing career up in a much more constructive way. Why? More importantly, how?

Call me crazy, but I don’t see many benefits in writing 50,000 words in one month. It burns people out, downplays the importance of planning and plotting, and gets people focused on word count instead of storytelling. That’s not to say that NaNoWriMo doesn’t have it’s upsides, because it certainly does, but I find larger benefits elsewhere.

There are three primary ways to make this challenging month work for your own goals.

Asking someone to write a novel in a month is a lot. Asking yourself to do that and then beating yourself up after the fact is even worse.

NaNo Hopefuls see these metrics and think they have to accomplish them, not realizing that, hey, guess what, you don’t need to write anything at all.

Do you have something that needs editing? A series you have to plan? Research you need to do? Do that instead. Set your goal to ‘storyboarding 20 pages’, or ‘take notes on the 13 untouched research books you have’. You’re not a failure just because you’re not actively drafting a novel.

NaNoWriMo Blog Banner #2: "Change the scope of your project"

50,000 words is a huge chunk, and that amount sets some people up for disappointment right out the gate. November is the holiday season, family obligations begin to pile up, and finding time to spend on writing is difficult. But remember this: 50,000 is an arbitrary number.

Yes, it’s the minimum necessary to be considered a novel, but aside from that, it doesn’t mean anything. Completing 20,000 words (or whatever your magic number is) is just as meaningful. Or a collection of poems. A series outline. Maybe even a perfected synopsis.

Stop expecting yourself to put down the same number of words as everyone else when your goals are inherently different.

 

NaNoWriMo Blog Banner #3: "Make your project suit your needs"

At this very moment, what do you need to do? What have you been putting off? What would benefit your work most at this very point in time, even if you’ve been avoiding it? There’s more to a successful writing career than just drafting a book. One of the ways I’ve made NaNoWriMo work for me is by aiming to knock out a big chunk of whatever it is I need to get done– even if I don’t want to.

For instance, I’ve been dragging my feet with making meaningful edits on my novel Death of an Immortal (formerly The Immortal). So for NaNoWriMo, I’ve set out to edit the remaining 49,000 words of it. I’m taking a chance to look at the huge missed opportunities that I would have otherwise decided not to deal with, and am instead tackling them. It’s a grueling process. But, it suits the needs of my book.

I would much rather make a leap forward in my writing career than have yet another 50,000+ story I need to edit.

 

Have you ever used NaNoWriMo outside of writing the traditional 50k? How did you change it up, and how did it benefit you? Comment below!

 

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Until next time!

 

 

 

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2 Comments

  1. I think I did use NaNo to edit once and, honestly, that was WAY tougher. I also like to use the month as a dedicated “do the thing” for whatever needs doing. So long as your priorities are straight and you’re making progress, more power to you!

    1. Exactly, a “do the thing” month! I’m a big fan of any sort of productivity challenge, such as the “100 days of productivity” challenge, the “don’t break the change” challenge, etc..

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