My First Camp NaNoWriMo Experience

Camp NaNoWriMo Banner

So, you’ve heard of NaNoWriMo. But have you heard of Camp NaNoWriMo? I hadn’t until a fellow writer introduced me to it.

For the uninitiated, NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month, wherein an online community of people attempt to write 50,000 words during the month of November. Why? Because people revel in pain, I suppose. While few complete the challenge, it still serves as a good starting point for beginning a novel.

However, I never participated in NaNoWriMo before, largely because I felt the format of the challenge was too restrictive.

Camp NaNoWriMo is far more flexible. Essentially, you get to choose how many words you want to write/hours you edit for/pages you do a storyboard of/etc. during the month of July. It’s for any and every type of creative, and is largely self-determined. When I heard this, I decided, hey, what the heck. I had a short story I wanted to turn into a novella anyhow (The Stolen Sun), so I signed up and never looked back.

It has been a great kick in the ass. Apologies for the profanity, but it really has been.

Allow me to let you in on a little secret. Before Camp NaNoWriMo, I hadn’t written in over a year.

“Egads!” you exclaim. “How can a writer such as yourself not write?” Exactly. I had been so busy editing what I’d already written and trying to stop writing altogether that I simply had not written anything at all for a year. When I heard about Camp NanoWriMo, I decided to change that.

Day 1:

I joined my writing ‘cabin’, (a group of likeminded writer friends; in this ‘cabin’ you can update others on your progress, see others’ stats, etc.), updated my project info, and… didn’t write anything. In my defense, it was a crazy busy day, and by day 2 I had written 1,200 words. So there’s that.

Picture of a Cabin
While this is a far cry from my online writing cabin, I can dream.
Day 10:

At this point, my word count was 4,962–which meant my novella had already surpassed the original short story in length! I also had already gathered research materials at this point, 11 heavy library books on ancient Mesopotamia, and was incorporating historically accurate information into the story as I went. I was riding an immense writing high at this point, and had already done 2 write-ins with other local cabin members.

Picture of Some Research Material
A page from one of my research books. Here is depicted two lamassu, guardian beings, in the rocky Mesopotamian landscape.
Day 20:

This day was… less great. Still great, but I was feeling down because my writing hadn’t been as consistent. I had written over 1,000 words on each of the previous 3 days, and then nothing on day 20. In my defense, I was incredibly sick, but still. It stung. All I could do was hope that I’d be able to get back on that horse and finish my 20,000 word goal before August 1st. I was already sitting at 9,109.

A gif of Justin Timberlake looking scoldingly at the camera.
Me to me when I don’t write.
Day 28:

On July 28th, I reached cloud nine. After a few word sprints, many late nights, and sacrificing my lunch breaks and sleep to write, I had reached my goal of completing my first draft for The Stolen Sun. I didn’t hit 20k, but the story didn’t require it. It reached its natural ending at 17.5k. As you can see from my word count tracker, there were ups and downs on this journey. Days when I wrote diddly, and days when I made leaps and bounds. But ultimately, the biggest thing that contributed to my success was the accumulation of small, regular efforts.

Ending Word Count

Overall, I’m incredibly happy that I participated in this.

This whole project is a great way to kick one’s butt into gear and put some serious words on the page. The goal flexibility was really the stand-out factor for me here.

But ultimately, there’s nothing magical about the month of July. There’s nothing Camp NaNoWriMo gave me that I couldn’t have done on my own. Aside from a word tracker and a group of dedicated writer friends, all that was holding me back was myself.

I sincerely hope this month-long exercise has helped get me back into the habit of writing regularly. At the very least, it’s been a fulfilling and rewarding experience that I recommend every creator try. While I still need to edit my novella two or three times, this experience alone has been huge in getting me this far.

If you’d like to stay up to date with my writings or be notified once The Stolen Sun comes out, you can sign up for my email list in the box below. (I won’t bombard you with emails, just send you an update or article about once a month.)


Until next time!

 

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How to Actually Accomplish Your New Year’s Resolutions

It’s finally 2017, and, having abandoned them in the past, you may or may not have set your New Year’s Resolutions. Here are my top five tips when setting and attempting to fulfill these ever-elusive goals.

New Year’s Resolutions are a big deal to me. I set about 12 a year, and usually accomplish 80% of those. Not too shabby! In order to come up with worthy goals and actually achieve them, here are my top five tips.

#1: Set Measurable Goals

Say you’re like millions of others and want to lose weight. What does that mean? Do you want to lose ten pounds, or three hundred? This is similar to those goals of people wanting to lose twenty pounds in a week; it’s unrealistic, unsustainable, and sets you up for failure from the get go. Have something you can measure day by day, and can actually track your progress on.

#2: Only Set Resolutions that Are Dependent on You

This is one that everybody falls into the trap of. For example, maybe you want to snag a promotion and make that a New Years Resolution. Now, I’m not one to stop others from aiming high–it’s a wonderful goal–but as far as a resolution, it’s not great. Why? Resolutions are something that you yourself resolve to do. And you’re not the one who ultimately decides if you get that promotion. Your boss does! What you can resolve to do instead is work your absolute hardest, put in good hours, volunteer for additional projects, and so forth.

#3: Break It Down Into Chunks

Part of the reason people don’t commit to big resolutions is because they seem so, well, big. But there are 12 months/52 weeks/365 days in a year. Women can create a person in that amount of time. Surely we can complete a goal of ours in that same window, right?

I like to break my goals down my month and week. For my current novel, THE IMMORTAL, I wanted to complete the first draft this year at about 70,000 words. That translates to about 5,800 words a month, and 1,350 a week. Knowing that, I have a plan of how many words to write a day. From there I simply have to put my butt in the chair and write. I frequently post monthly updates to my blog to keep myself accountable for what I’ve actually done.

#4: Choose Long-Term Interests

Listen, NY Resolutions are for an entire year. As we established above, that’s a lot of time. So if you’ve picked up a fleeting interests in, say, extreme ironing, don’t assume you’ll stay interested in it for the next 12 months.

#5: Don’t Share Your Plans, Share Your Progress

Heard the cliche ‘talk is cheap’? There’s a reason it’s so common. People love to talk about what they’re going to do, but rarely do it. Think of how many people say they’re going to write a book, yet have never sat down to write out a full outline, nonetheless an entire novel.

When we talk about our plans, we often overestimate what (if any) progress we’ve made on them. But if we let our actual progress speak for us, then both ourselves and others will take note.

 

I hope you found these tips helpful, and implement a few of them into your goal setting! What are your New Years Resolutions? Comment below!

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