A Week in Hong Kong

 

When I initially booked my trip to Hong Kong, it was just some spot on the map to broaden my horizons, a place to visit then check off the list. But I had no idea just what I was in for.

Put simply, Hong Kong blew me away.

But why? Well settle in, because here I’m going to tell you what I saw, did, and loved so dearly in Hong Kong.

Day 1: Tian Tan Buddha, Po Lin Monastery, Victoria Harbor

For y first full day in the city, I went to Lantau Island, where after a both enthralling and terrifying cable car ride I arrived at Ngong Ping, home to the Po Lin monastery and the Tian Tan Buddha. Po Lin is a buddhist monastery, founded in 1906. With beautiful architecture and a deeply reverent atmosphere, it was a little oasis away from the mega-city just one island over.

Po Lin monastery.
Po Lin monastery.

The Tian Tan buddha, one of the world’s largest outdoor bronze buddha statues, is an extension of the monastery, and can be see from as far away as Macau on a bright day. Coming to the top for the view alone is worth it. (Plus, up here I got to try my first ever egg tart, and I instantly fell in love. I think I ate almost 30 in the 6 days I was there, and I still want more.)

The Tian Tan buddha.
The Tian Tan buddha.

Once I got back to where I was staying around Tsim Sha Tsui, I walked along Victoria Harbor, saw a particularly awesome street performers, ate yet more snacks (yes, including egg tart), and watched the sun set. Victoria Harbor is really where Hong Kong began to steal my heart. The abundance of life, the city skyline contrasting with the mountains and ocean, the romantic atmosphere, the food, all of it culminated into a really beautiful scene. And it was only my first day here!

Victoria Harbor.
Victoria Harbor.

Day 2: Macau’s Ruins of St. Paul, Monte Fort, and A-Ma Temple

On the second day of my travels, I went over on a day trip to Macau with zero idea of what to expect. Macau isn’t really a place I’d researched much beforehand, but dang, I am SO glad that I went. After driving around and seeing some of the skyline, I hopped off near the historic city center where a ton of cultural sites were. Considering that Macau is only 11.8 sq miles large, (or 30.5 sq kilometers for my reasonable, non-metric friends), there’s a very dense concentration of history here.

Directions in the city center of Macau.
Directions in the city center of Macau.

I made my way to St. Dominic’s square, got a snack or two, and took in the scenery.  It’s a place very thoroughly Chinese, but also definitely retaining colonial influences, a city that is new and sparkling, but also ancient. These things all blended together in beautiful harmony, not clashing or begging for attention, but there to be seen all the same. Nearby I visited both the Ruins of St. Paul Cathedral and Monte Fort.

Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral.
Ruins of St. Paul’s Cathedral.

After another jaunt on the bus, I got off in the old city to see A-Ma temple. A-Ma temple is a huge deal, and in so many ways. Right on the shoreline, this is thought to be where the Portuguese first disembarked in 1513, the first Europeans ever to make contact with China by sea. In the native language, the name of this temple is Maā Gǒk and thus, the Portuguese called it Macau. 

A-Ma temple.
A-Ma temple.

Even though I hadn’t seen everything, I’d had a fun-filled day, and eventually headed back to Hong Kong.

Day 3: Flower Market, Victoria’s Peak

By day three, I’d made friends with another woman staying in my hostel, and we get some warm breakfast drinks and egg waffles together. I tried the ceylon milk tea, but the real star was Mammy Pancake. I’ve heard about Mammy Pancake for years now, and, even though it’s a street food stand, this place has been Michelin recognized for three years in a row now. I got multiple egg waffles while I was in Hong Kong, crisp on the outside, soft and sweet on the inside, and each one was somehow more delicious than the last.

Eating a green tea chocolate chip egg waffle.
Eating a green tea chocolate chip egg waffle.

After this, we went to peruse the local flower markets. I’d seen flower sellers before, but the sheer size here blew my mind. This wasn’t just a street, or even an entire block, but multiple blocks of flowers, bamboo, succulents, and everything else spilling out into the streets in an array of color and smells. We spent a good amount of the day doing this, so it was already starting to get dark by the time I went on my next adventure to Victoria Peak. I have no words to say about Victoria Peak that would do it justice. Only experiencing it for yourself could ever convey the absolute majesty it holds. It was truly a wonderful way to end the day. 

The view from Victoria Peak at night.
The view from Victoria Peak at night.

Day 4: Man Mo Temple, New Year Parade

The next morning, I took the historic Star Ferry over to Hong Kong Island, where things had become very crowded since it was officially the first day of the Lunar New Year. After fighting against the crowds I  made it to Man Mo temple. As is to be expected, the temple was PACKED, being a major holiday, and people want to honor their ancestors, pray for good luck, and start the year out on the right foot. 

Offerings at Man Mo temple.
Offerings at Man Mo temple.

It was already getting late by the time I left, so I went back to my hostel to nap in preparation for the New Years parade. I woke up from that ready to fight a crowd of people probably larger than my entire home town, but all in all though, the whole crowd got to see some interesting acts, cute balloon floats, and just some generally weird performances, but by far the Lion and Dragon dancers stole the entire show. It was simply beautiful and fun and the perfect end to a rich holiday.

Day 5: Ladies Market, Hong Kong Park, Sky100

The next day,  I toured around the Ladies Market off Tung Choi street, but didn’t buy anything since I’m not much of a shopper. I just like to take in the sights and sounds of a new place, y’know? Afterwards, I decided to try out the local park, easily one of the most beautiful green spaces I’ve ever seen. At the entrance there was a gushing water feature you could stand under, little streams lined with flowers, and yet more fountains.There was also an aviary, waterfalls, a tea house, and a sizable pond for koi and carp, peaceful and warm in the winter sunlight.

Hong Kong Park.
Hong Kong Park.

After watching the Symphony of Lights, a nightly light show put on in Victoria Harbor, I went up to the Sky100, the 100th floor of the International Commerce Center, to get yet another view of Hong Kong. I simply couldn’t get enough of that skyline!

The view of Victoria Harbor from the Sky100.
The view of Victoria Harbor from the Sky100.

Day 6: Bus Tour, Stanley and Aberdeen area

For my last day I bought a ticket for the Big Bus, a bus with three lines all over Hong Kong Island and Kowloon, which I figured would be a good way to see parts of the city I hadn’t yet gotten the opportunity to go to. After the Kowloon line, I took a ferry across to Hong Kong Island and got on the line to Stanley and Aberdeen. On our way we toured the glitzy finance and commerce district, and eventually made our way to the south side of the island, where you could see relatively undisturbed ocean, beaches full of people, and so on. 

 

All in all, Hong Kong was amazing, and as soon as I returned home I already wanted to go back. There the modern and the classical harmonized together, the rich Chinese heritage paired with western influences made for mouth-watering food and breathtaking sights, all of that and more has earned Hong Kong a special place in my heart, and I’m confident that I will be going back again and again.

 

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Nanhu Park

The first time I went to Nanhu park, I was astonished.

The parks I’d been accustomed to back home were nowhere near as scenic nor bustling with activity. They were more like patches of grass and a couple of trees, maybe a bench or basketball hoop at most. But at 2.2 square kilometers, Nanhu park is huge–and gorgeous. There you can see a beautiful lake, trees, gardens, etc. It truly has so much to offer! 

A chair-sled…thing. I asked at least 6 native Mandarin speakers what these were called, but no one could give me an answer!

In the summer it’s verdant and lush, but wintertime (when I shot this video) is beautiful as well. And there’s plenty to do. Ice-fishing, skating, sledding, people on these chair-skating-contraptions (I’m really not sure what else to call them) and hockey, are just part of what Nanhu has to offer. Depending on the time of year, you can see an abundance of ice and snow sculptures too.

Though winters can be difficult here, being so cold and with little sunlight, there’s a certain beauty to it that I’ve really found myself appreciating. I can’t wait to see this place thaw into the green of spring, and I can’t wait to share more of China with you. 

What is your favorite park you’ve ever been to? Why? Leave a comment below!
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Seattle 2017 | Travel Vlog

Seattle holds a special place in my heart. The fresh-air markets, mountains on the horizon, transportation system, abundance of international cuisines, and people are just a few of the things that make my heart sing. To this day, Seattle is the only city I’ve ever visited multiple times!

Take a peek at my travel video below to see some of the sights Seattle has to offer.

Have you ever been to Seattle? What cities have stolen your heart? Leave a comment below and spark a discussion!

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Christmas While Abroad

Christmas is my hands-down, no-contest, favorite time of the year. This also means it’s a sentimental season for me, as it is for many people around the globe. But, being in China for it has definitely thrown my holiday spirits for a loop.

Did I at least get peppermint treats, you may ask? Christmas movies? Time with loved ones? Curling up with hot cocoa to partake in holiday traditions? Nope. Sadly, it was a regular day, wherein I tried not to focus on what I was missing back home.

Photo Credit: Toa Heftiba

But that’s how you make it through these periods. I knew what I signed up for when I came here–and I gained more perspective through it, too. What must it be like for Chinese people living in Kansas during the Lunar New Year? What must it be like for Indian people in Texas during Diwali?

Before I could only imagine their pain. Now, I’ve experienced it myself.

Regardless, I will move forward. I’m blessed to be living abroad, even if it is sometime difficult, and still am excited to experience all the wonderful things it has to offer.

Watch the full video above to hear more of my thoughts on the topic. What’s the most difficult holiday experience you’ve ever had? What made it so, and what did you learn from it? Comment below!

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Moving to China! | TRAVEL VIDEO

So, I’ve officially jumped. I’ve taken the plunge head-first into moving abroad, officially moving to China for a one-year contract as a teacher. I packed up my belongings, said goodbye to my family and pets, then got on the plane to China. And, honestly?

I was confident and excited–up until the moment I zipped my bags closed. Then, I was scared shitless.

“Who Does This?!”

Every way this scenario could go wrong played out in my head. Every fear I had about China plagued my dreams, both when my mind wandered and in my sleep. Who does this? I’d wonder, and it was a fair point. Who leaves everything and everyone they’ve ever known to go live overseas, in a place where they don’t fluently speak the language, they don’t know a single person, and they don’t know what’s waiting for them?

But, apparently, I do. After a lot of mental wrestling matches and talking myself out of buying a ticket home, I decided to stop. Self-doubt certainly wouldn’t make this any easier.

What Moving Abroad Has Taught Me

Moving abroad was a risk, but, these many months later, it’s one I’m glad I took. China hasn’t been perfect. No place is. But, it has thoroughly changed me for the better. It has taught me what I’m capable of withstanding and doing (like enduring the Christmas season utterly alone), as well as exposed me to new experiences and tested my spirit. Ultimately, I could make an entire separate post about all of this. (Keep your eyes open for it!)

For now, I’ll continue to persevere, foster self-confidence, and carry on.

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What’s one experience you’ve had where you experienced self-doubt, but finally overcame?

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How to Actually Accomplish Your New Year’s Resolutions

It’s finally 2017, and, having abandoned them in the past, you may or may not have set your New Year’s Resolutions. Here are my top five tips when setting and attempting to fulfill these ever-elusive goals.

New Year’s Resolutions are a big deal to me. I set about 12 a year, and usually accomplish 80% of those. Not too shabby! In order to come up with worthy goals and actually achieve them, here are my top five tips.

#1: Set Measurable Goals

Say you’re like millions of others and want to lose weight. What does that mean? Do you want to lose ten pounds, or three hundred? This is similar to those goals of people wanting to lose twenty pounds in a week; it’s unrealistic, unsustainable, and sets you up for failure from the get go. Have something you can measure day by day, and can actually track your progress on.

#2: Only Set Resolutions that Are Dependent on You

This is one that everybody falls into the trap of. For example, maybe you want to snag a promotion and make that a New Years Resolution. Now, I’m not one to stop others from aiming high–it’s a wonderful goal–but as far as a resolution, it’s not great. Why? Resolutions are something that you yourself resolve to do. And you’re not the one who ultimately decides if you get that promotion. Your boss does! What you can resolve to do instead is work your absolute hardest, put in good hours, volunteer for additional projects, and so forth.

#3: Break It Down Into Chunks

Part of the reason people don’t commit to big resolutions is because they seem so, well, big. But there are 12 months/52 weeks/365 days in a year. Women can create a person in that amount of time. Surely we can complete a goal of ours in that same window, right?

I like to break my goals down my month and week. For my current novel, THE IMMORTAL, I wanted to complete the first draft this year at about 70,000 words. That translates to about 5,800 words a month, and 1,350 a week. Knowing that, I have a plan of how many words to write a day. From there I simply have to put my butt in the chair and write. I frequently post monthly updates to my blog to keep myself accountable for what I’ve actually done.

#4: Choose Long-Term Interests

Listen, NY Resolutions are for an entire year. As we established above, that’s a lot of time. So if you’ve picked up a fleeting interests in, say, extreme ironing, don’t assume you’ll stay interested in it for the next 12 months.

#5: Don’t Share Your Plans, Share Your Progress

Heard the cliche ‘talk is cheap’? There’s a reason it’s so common. People love to talk about what they’re going to do, but rarely do it. Think of how many people say they’re going to write a book, yet have never sat down to write out a full outline, nonetheless an entire novel.

When we talk about our plans, we often overestimate what (if any) progress we’ve made on them. But if we let our actual progress speak for us, then both ourselves and others will take note.

 

I hope you found these tips helpful, and implement a few of them into your goal setting! What are your New Years Resolutions? Comment below!

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