Three Ways to Make NaNoWriMo Work for You

NaNoWriMo. One of the most talked-about months of the year for authors and casual writers alike, but few actually take on the challenge. Fewer still finish it.

I’m one of those people. I have never used November to write 50,000 words in one go. Instead, I’ve used it to build my writing career up in a much more constructive way. Why? More importantly, how?

Call me crazy, but I don’t see many benefits in writing 50,000 words in one month. It burns people out, downplays the importance of planning and plotting, and gets people focused on word count instead of storytelling. That’s not to say that NaNoWriMo doesn’t have it’s upsides, because it certainly does, but I find larger benefits elsewhere.

There are three primary ways to make this challenging month work for your own goals.

Asking someone to write a novel in a month is a lot. Asking yourself to do that and then beating yourself up after the fact is even worse.

NaNo Hopefuls see these metrics and think they have to accomplish them, not realizing that, hey, guess what, you don’t need to write anything at all.

Do you have something that needs editing? A series you have to plan? Research you need to do? Do that instead. Set your goal to ‘storyboarding 20 pages’, or ‘take notes on the 13 untouched research books you have’. You’re not a failure just because you’re not actively drafting a novel.

NaNoWriMo Blog Banner #2: "Change the scope of your project"

50,000 words is a huge chunk, and that amount sets some people up for disappointment right out the gate. November is the holiday season, family obligations begin to pile up, and finding time to spend on writing is difficult. But remember this: 50,000 is an arbitrary number.

Yes, it’s the minimum necessary to be considered a novel, but aside from that, it doesn’t mean anything. Completing 20,000 words (or whatever your magic number is) is just as meaningful. Or a collection of poems. A series outline. Maybe even a perfected synopsis.

Stop expecting yourself to put down the same number of words as everyone else when your goals are inherently different.

 

NaNoWriMo Blog Banner #3: "Make your project suit your needs"

At this very moment, what do you need to do? What have you been putting off? What would benefit your work most at this very point in time, even if you’ve been avoiding it? There’s more to a successful writing career than just drafting a book. One of the ways I’ve made NaNoWriMo work for me is by aiming to knock out a big chunk of whatever it is I need to get done– even if I don’t want to.

For instance, I’ve been dragging my feet with making meaningful edits on my novel Death of an Immortal (formerly The Immortal). So for NaNoWriMo, I’ve set out to edit the remaining 49,000 words of it. I’m taking a chance to look at the huge missed opportunities that I would have otherwise decided not to deal with, and am instead tackling them. It’s a grueling process. But, it suits the needs of my book.

I would much rather make a leap forward in my writing career than have yet another 50,000+ story I need to edit.

 

Have you ever used NaNoWriMo outside of writing the traditional 50k? How did you change it up, and how did it benefit you? Comment below!

 

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Until next time!

 

 

 

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What I Want to See More of in Fantasy

I love fantasy stories. It’s the genre I was almost exclusively raised on, from The Chronicles of Narnia to Harry Potter and beyond.

However, as I’ve gotten older and read more widely, I’ve developed a problem with the fantasy genre. No, it’s not the ever-present tropes or the derivative material, though that’s certainly made many stories stale. No, my biggest issue is with something else.

It’s the world-building itself.

This isn’t a list of what not to do in world-building, because I feel like conversations in that vein leave so much out of the broader picture. If I just say “don’t make a derivative European fantasy world”, that does nothing to point you in the right direction.

Here is what I want to see more of in fantasy:
Varied Medical Systems

Is it just potions? A wave of a magic wand and, bam, you’re cured? If so, I would advise taking a deeper look into developing your medical system. Is it tied to religion or purely science based? What is the basis of the medical system, and why? How did people gather their medical knowledge, or is it completely disorganized? Who gets medical care at all?

Significant Religious Systems

Religion plays a big part in our world, impacting politics, culture, and so on. However, this is rarely something I see in fantasy stories. If religion is acknowledged at all, it’s a relatively universal system with little diversity between nations. That would be akin to pretending only one religion (let’s say Christianity, for example) existed out in the world, and that there was only one sect of it, no less. Think of how different our world would look without that one religion.

Unless you want a neat and tidy and bland world, do something different. Create disagreements, create schisms and religious texts for followers to dispute over, create opposing beliefs, and so on.

Monotheism, polytheism, dualism, deism, pantheism, etc. The list goes on and on.
Different Governmental Structures

Look, I get it. Monarchies are cool. I certainly use them a lot in my stories, but there is SO much more out there, especially if you’re building an entire fantasy world from the ground up. There are democracies, oligarchies, stratocracies, crowned republics, and so forth. Is it realistic for a world to only have monarchs? How would different countries interact with each other, like for instance a parliamentary system engaging with a despot nation?

Mixed Gender Dynamics

While biological sexes are distinct, gender is very different. It’s a social construct. The roles and rules our society has made up surrounding them are just that. Made up. That’s not to say that they’re useless (which is a whole different discussion outside the scope of this blog), but it does mean that they’re mutable. And why should every society have the same way of looking at men and women, especially in fantasy?

Show me societies where childrearing is of prime importance, where men are the primary healers and teachers, where women have roles in governance and business. There are examples of these things in our own world, so why not in fantasy?

Above is a Mosuo woman of Yunnan, China, one of the world’s few remaining matriarchal societies.
Diverse Source Cultures

Look, there’s a lot more inspiration out there than just Medieval Europe. I promise. Many people draw inspiration from other pre-existing cultures for their works, and there’s more than enough material out there. Ancient Sumer (where my upcoming novella The Stolen Sun takes place), Korea’s Chosun dynasty, Mesoamerican Aztecs, Gupta period India, Ethopia’s Axumite empire, and so on. Spin the globe, pick a spot, and research that area. It’s a big world out there.

Our world isn’t a bland monolith. Don’t let your story be one.

 

Some people may feel bogged down with all of these questions, or that these details are boring. Thinking that way is missing the point.

Thinking about these things when world-building can generate a wealth of story ideas, add flavor and richness to your plots, and set it apart from other stories. It will only serve to distinguish and enrich your creation. I can’t tell you how few stories I’ve read that have variety in any of these aspects.

And wouldn’t it be nice to be original?

If you’d like to stay up to date with my writings or be notified once The Stolen Sun comes out, you can sign up for my email list in the box below. (I won’t bombard you with emails, just send you an update or article about once a month.)


 

Until next time!

 

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